A Wetland of International Importance

Sandhill Cranes at the Horicon Marsh

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes exemplify grace and beauty while preening beside the auto tour at the Horicon Marsh.  Ornithologists predicted their extinction in the early 1900s due to wetland drainage and unlimited hunting, according to Birds of Lake, Pond and Marsh: Water and Wetland Birds of Eastern North America by John Eastman.  They were classified as threatened until 1973.

Sandhill Crane at the Horicon Marsh

Thankfully, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 prohibited hunting Sandhill Cranes and other migratory birds which helped to save them from extinction.  Currently, the North American Waterbird Conservation Plan lists them as a Species of Low Concern.

Sandhill Cranes at the Horicon Marsh

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act is an agreement between the U.S. and Great Britain (for Canada), the U.S. and Mexico, the U.S. and Japan, and the U.S. and Russia.  The Treaty gives the Secretary of the Interior and individual states the authority to protect migratory birds, including their nests and eggs. Violations result in misdemeanor charges and fines up to $15,000.  Selling migratory birds, in violation of this law, constitutes a felony.  A treaty with Russia protects ecosystems against pollution and other environmental degradations that affect migratory birds.

Spotted Sandpiper at the Horicon Marsh

Spotted Sandpiper

The Spotted Sandpiper is the most widespread breeding sandpiper in North America. Its numbers have declined, but not to the extent of the Sandhill Crane. Loss of wetland habitat and the effects of herbicides and pesticides affect their ability to raise their young. The Horicon Marsh is a welcomed haven for them. The male takes the primary role in parental care, incubating the eggs and taking care of the chicks.

Spotted Sandpiper at the Horicon Marsh

This view reveals more of his spots.

Where is the Bird?

Where is the Bird?

Speaking of spots, can you spot the Black-crowned Night-Heron?

Black-crowned Night-Heron at the Horicon Marsh

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Tightly grasping a willow branch, he was tossed to and fro in the wind.  I was surprised he held on for so long as he whipped forward and back.

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night-Herons must enjoy sultry evenings at the Horicon Marsh.  I saw three in a row perched, strolling, or standing.

Black Saddlebags Skimmer

Black Saddlebags Skimmer

The Black Saddlebags Skimmer was drawn to this particular dead stalk.  There were many to choose from, but this was his favorite, for some unknown reason.  His name comes from the coloring of his wings that resembles saddlebags.  His body is black. Even though dragonflies have six legs, like other insects, they cannot walk.  They are predators of mosquitos.  This is a species we definitely want to protect!

The Horicon Marsh has been aptly recognized as a Wetland of International Importance.

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