Angry Birds

Herring Gulls at the Horicon Marsh

Herring Gulls Fishing at the Horicon Marsh

Herring Gulls chip away at the icy surface of the Horicon Marsh to find frozen fish underneath.  It is not a good idea to flaunt your fish filet.

Juvenile Herring Gull at the Horicon Marsh

Juvenile Herring Gull

This juvenile Herring Gull aggressively responds to a gull that got too close to its fishing hole.

Herring Gulls at the Horicon Marsh

Herring Gulls in the Battle for Fish

The birds battle for open fishing holes. If a gull gets a large piece of fish, the rest of the flock gather around to try and steal some for themselves.

Herring Gulls at the Horicon Marsh

After chaotic flapping of wings and loud squawking, a victor eats the spoil.

Canada Geese at the Horicon Marsh

Canada Geese in a Display of Aggression

Meanwhile, the Canada Geese were honking, hissing, and sticking out their tongues in their own displays of aggression.

Canada Geese at the Horicon Marsh

They flare their wings and run offenders off of their turf, a muskrat house, in this case.

House Sparrow at the Horicon Marsh

House Sparrow

In contrast to the aggressive displays of the gulls and geese, the pretty House Sparrow is content to flit and perch in shrubs along the Marsh.

House Sparrow at the Horicon Marsh According to the American Museum of Natural History’s Birds of North America:  Eastern Region, House Sparrows are a member of the Eurasian family called weaver-finches. The House Sparrow was first introduced in Brooklyn, New York in 1850 and is now one of North American’s most common birds.

Female House Sparrow at the Horicon Marsh

Female House Sparrow

American Goldfinch at the Horicon Marsh

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch perches peacefully with the House Sparrows.

Bird activity is increasing at the Horicon Marsh as we head into spring!

 

 

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