Spring Bird Species at the Horicon Marsh

Forster's Terns at the Horicon Marsh

Forster’s Terns

Forster’s Terns perch on last year’s cattails along Highway 49 at the Horicon Marsh. English botanist Thomas Nuttall named this tern after Johann  Reinhold Forster, a naturalist who accompanied the English explorer Captain Cook on his epic second voyage (1772-75), according to Birds of North America: Eastern Region. If you could have a bird named after you, what species would you choose? Share your choice in the comments section.

Blue-winged Teal

Male Blue-winged Teal

A pair of Blue-winged Teal swim in the water along the auto tour. They are usually skittish and fly away quickly when approached, but this pair was content to swim and eat while being photographed.

Female Blue-winged Teal at the Horicon Marsh

Female Blue-winged Teal

The female Blue-winged Teal looks similar to most other female dabbling ducks, but she is distinguished by a patch of blue on the upper wing coverts.

Fish at the Horicon Marsh

Fish

Schools of fish swim with their backs out of the water and their dorsal fins exposed. It may be related to shallow water in that area or it may be related to water temperature. Fish may swim near the surface in spring due to cooler temperatures.  In summer, they may swim deeper where it’s cooler.

Double-crested Cormorant at the Horicon Marsh

Double-crested Cormorant

The Double-crested Cormorant swims with its body submerged and its bill in the air.  It has beautiful blue eyes.

Northern Shoveler at the Horicon Marsh

Northern Shoveler

The yellow eye of the Northern Shoveler contrasts with its metallic greenish to purplish head feathers.  Flocks of Shovelers continue to swim along Highway 49.

Female Red-winged Blackbird at the Horicon Marsh

Female Red-winged Blackbird

This female Red-winged Blackbird looks nothing like its mate. They like to nest among the cattails from March to June.

Gull at the Horicon Marsh

Gull

What type of gull do you think this is? Share your thoughts in the comments area.

Bird activity is picking up at the Horicon Marsh and many species are nesting. Be careful driving on Highway 49. You may need to wait for goslings crossing the road.

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