Swimming, Perching, or Strolling at the Horicon Marsh

Killdeer at the Horicon Marsh

Killdeer

This fluffy adult Killdeer keeps watch on the rocks along the edge of the Horicon Marsh. Two juvenile Killdeer are nearby. You can see one hiding in the rocks behind the adult.

Juvenile Killdeer at the Horicon Marsh

Juvenile Killdeer

This juvenile Killdeer has not developed the red eye ring yet. The double dark neck bands are becoming visible.

Common Moorhen Chicks at the Horicon Marsh

Common Moorhen Chicks

These little black fluff balls with red beaks and crowns are Common Moorhen Chicks. Their parent stays nearby and occasionally holds up a wad of marsh vegetation for the chicks to munch on.

Common Moorhen with Chick at the Horicon Marsh

Common Moorhen with Chick

It also uses marsh vegetation to build a platform for its nest.

Sandhill Cranes at the Horicon Marsh

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill cranes tilt their heads back and call in between feeding. This was the only pair in the area.

Great Egret at the Horicon Marsh

Great Egret

The Great Egret prefers to quietly stroll in the shallow water.

Tree Swallow at the Horicon Marsh

Juvenile Tree Swallow

This juvenile Tree Swallow prefers to perch higher. He hasn’t developed the bluish green upperparts and he has a partial breast band.

Juvenile Peregrine Falcon at the Horicon Marsh

Juvenile Peregrine Falcon

Perching even higher is this juvenile Peregrine Falcon. Peregrine Falcons may reach speeds of up to 200 mph when swooping or diving for prey according to Chris Earley in Hawks and Owls of Eastern North America.

Whether swimming, perching, or strolling, the diversity of birds at the Horicon Marsh is amazing!

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